Motivation Continued

Training, specifically the occasional really tough session, strengthens your mindset in a way that transfers to your entire life. In those difficult physical moments you can train your brain to react with a certain mental toughness that can not only get you through races, competitions, and training, but also through work, relationships and any curve ball life throws at you. You can train your brain and create better habits. 

What is mental toughness?  Let’s break it down. 

Quitting in the middle of a work out or eating foods we know make us sick are not physical limitations, they are situations in which we listened to the little voice in our head that said:
"I can’t”
“I'm not good enough”
"I'm tired"
Mental Toughness is having the ability to work through these moments and push your limitations instead of listening to this voice. It's the ability to stay motivated to make healthy choices day to day. It  means having positivity and not giving up when something goes wrong. 

How do we change it?
It’s pretty simple actually, we just teach that little voice to be on our side. 

Step One: Bringing awareness to your everyday self talk

Ever hear yourself saying things like "I'll just eat the cookie, I already blew it anyways! God, I look awful in this shirt". Would you ever talk to your best friend like that? I hope not! So why do we think it's okay  to speak ourselves that way? Start by noticing your inner voice when it tries to bring you down. Simply acknowledge the feeling and keep going. You don’t have to act on any of those thoughts, or believe them for that matter. Instead of immediately reaching for the chips, think, "interesting, my brain wants me to eat those chips, but in reality I want to feel good, so I don't them". You'll be surprised at how calling out your cravings and thoughts actually starts to change  your mindset. Every time you stop and don't act on the thought, you are breaking that habit and rewiring your brain to make better decisions. 

Step Two: The 3rd Person

3rd person self talk is a tool for in the heat of the moment when you start to struggle. 

For many years I thought my self talk meant I was crazy. Since I can remember I’ve referred to myself as ‘Hil’ any time I was doing any difficult like sprinting up a trail, “common Hil, you can do this”  or “just get through the next 30 seconds, you can do anything for 30 seconds”.
 
The main thing I noticed is I am 100% more positive when I’m thinking like this.
As it turns out, according to Psychology Today the top performers in business and athletics all consistently refer to themselves in the 3rd person. The science behind it? “Essentially, we think referring to yourself in the third person leads people to think about themselves more similar to how they think about others, and you can see evidence for this in the brain. That helps people gain a tiny bit of psychological distance from their experiences, which can often be useful for regulating emotions.” -  Jason Moser, http://msutoday.msu.edu

Next time you feel like quitting, give it a try! Maybe even practice it when you're face to face with those chips. Nobody will hear you so why not right? 

With these two tools you can train your brain to be a positive influence, break through your limits, and stay motivated